Adult Wednesday Addams Bad. Captain America Porn Good.

Ralph M. RiveraCopyright3 Comments

In a world where Marvel and DC partner to threaten boutique content creators for using the phrase "super hero," one has to wonder why they allow the mass distribution of porn parodies.

Did I mention that I bought an Apple TV? No? I bought an Apple TV.

Now that we’re all caught up…

I found a series on YouTube called “Adult Wednesday Addams” that was hysterical. It’s a parody of what life would be like in the real world for a grown up Wednesday Addams. The creator of the series, the brilliant and funny Melissa Hunter, had such success with the first season that she launched a successful fundraising campaign to complete a second season. After seeing both seasons, I wanted to watch them again, but this time on our big screen with my wife. That’s where the Apple TV comes in.

We buy the Apple TV, install it and can you guess what happened next?

If you guessed that the show was immediately pulled off YouTube as a result of a copyright claim, you’d be right. So poor Carol Lynn never got to see a single episode.

But in an ironic twist, you can still purchase a copy of The Addams Family XXX, a pornographic interpretation by Exquisite Films. If you are more into vintage porn and want to see Cortez get romantic, you can also check out the 1991 adult film The Maddams Family. The latter features renowned thespian Ron Jeremy.

I’m not crying foul or claiming that creativity is under attack, but in a world where Marvel and DC partner to threaten boutique content creators for using the phrase “super hero,” one has to wonder why they allow the mass distribution of Spiderman XXX: A Porn Parody, Superman Vs. Spiderman XXX: An Axel Braun Parody and Avengers XXX 2: An Axel Braun Parody. The list of porn parodies by an assortment of adult entertainment companies is long and distinguished.

I imagine they recognize that the real threat is Melissa Hunter.

These are my 300 words for the day. I am Ralph M. Rivera.

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In a world where Marvel and DC partner to threaten boutique content creators for using the phrase "super hero," one has to wonder why they allow the mass distribution of porn parodies.

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Hi, I'm Ralph! I'm a web developer and founder of Rahvalor Interactive, a creative marketing services company based in Holmdel, New Jersey. I founded Rahvalor in 1999 with my wife and business partner Carol Lynn, and in January 2012 we created Web.Search.Social as a branded service offering that brings enterprise-level services to small businesses in an affordable way. My primary role is programming and development, and with 25 solid years of marketing experience behind me, I write, consult and develop strategy for our customers. I'm also the CTO of Triberr and I teach web development at Manhattan College in New York City. Carol Lynn and I live near the coast in central New Jersey, less than an hour from the place of my birth – the island of Manhattan. We are at the constant beck and call of Ash, our 17-year-old American Shorthair cat. I'm also trying to build a flux capacitor, but that's not going as well as the other stuff I do.
  • The problem with this is not that copyright is worth or not worth protecting in A or B. The issue is fair use and the fuzzy lines around it.

    The porn movies are always billed and presented as parodies. Yes, they use the characters and graphic sex, but parody is a strong protected use under fair use. So much so that a challenge to them seems likely to fail.

    Adult Wednesday Addams is, at best, more borderline. They took the character and made her adult but there isn’t much indicating that they were parodying the original content in any way, just creating a new work based upon it. That being said, it still could have been transformative enough to be a fair use, but now we’re having conversations about interpretations of the law and how a judge/jury will see it.

    There’s also a size differential here. AWA was an independent venture while porn parodies are backed by large companies that can defend themselves easily. In short, they’re not going after the porn parodies unless they are 100% sure they can win but they can afford to go out on at least a little bit of a limb with AWA.

    In the end, while I can understand your view, copyright lists this as an apples to oranges comparison. A clear self-identified parody versus a derivative work. Hope that helps!

  • I love that @plagiarismtoday:disqus weighed in on this! (because I saw the twitter handle). Interesting stuff as I’m an insurance guy and have to deal with some of these things under media liability and personal/advertising injury

    • Hey @brett924:disqus > Great to see you here. I’m honored that you would take time to read my ludicrous musings.